Byrne Hall

Byrne Hall
The Academy building was turned over to DePaul University, and renamed Byrne Hall. Bygone DePaul | Special Collections & Archives

Introduction

About the DePaul Emeritus Society

DePaul University values its ongoing connections with its faculty and staff retirees, as it values their past contributions to the university’s mission. The DePaul University Emeritus Society was founded in 2008 with the merger of the Staff Emeritus Society and the Emeritus Professors Association. The Society is sponsored by the University’s Office of Mission and Values.

The purpose of the DePaul Emeritus Society is to provide a means for ongoing connection, communication, and socialization between the university and its emeritus faculty and staff, and between individual retirees whose professional lives were for so many years dedicated to university service.

Photos, events, and information of interest to members of the DePaul Emeritus Society will be posted to this blog. Please take a look, add your comment, offer to be an "author" or just enjoy.

Sunday, June 30, 2019

Book Club, June 10

Lillian Boxfish Takes a Walk, by Kathleen Rooney was a great book for retirees to read. Set in New York in the 1980's, the 84 year old woman remembers her life as she walks one night through the city. As she walked,  passing places where she had lived, worked, and eaten, she recounted memories of her past. Through the places and those memories, Rooney wove a tale of reconciliation of a personal past and present, including regrets and revelations. In addition to evoking decades old Manhattan, the story of Lillian emphasized the role that civility plays in humanizing us, that casual interactions can have powerful impact on lives, and that memories can sustain us. We enjoyed the book and the conversation.


Our next book will be Born A Crime by Trevor Noah. You can read a review here here. We  meet Wednesday, June 5 in Room 115 of the Richardson Library.  We gather at 11, with discussion from 11:30 to 12:30, so please bring your brown bag lunch!  For further information contact Kathryn DeGraff or Helen Marlborough.


We will continue to review the titles on our list for consideration for upcoming discussions. Please let Kathryn, Helen, or anyone else in the group, know if you have a favorite book you would like to share with your DES colleagues. As you can tell from the posts, we are interested in a wide range of fiction and non fiction. We enjoy our sessions thoroughly and always have room for more people and more insights.

Thursday, June 20, 2019

Salma Ghanem appointed interim provost

Thursday, June 13, 2019


A LOOK BACK, A LOOK FORWARD: SNL TRANSITIONS TO SCHOOL OF CONTINUING AND PROFESSIONAL STUDIES


By Abigail Pickus / June 13, 2019 / Posted in: CAMPUS AND COMMUNITY Facebook

SNL celebration 2019


On May 31, DePaul hosted a gala celebrating the School for New Learning and its transition to the School of Continuing and Professional Studies.



 (Diane M. Smutny/DMS Photography)


The School for New Learning was founded nearly half a century ago. As the newly branded School of Continuing and Professional Studies, it continues to offer adult learners innovative programs that meet their needs.

When SNL opened its doors in 1972, the nation was in the midst of what came to be known as the nontraditional student movement.

“This meant the student came before the institution. That sounds basic now, but up to that time, the questions were always ‘what did the institution think’ not ‘what did the student think,’” recalls SNL founding Dean Howard Sulkin in a 1998 documentary DePaul produced in honor of the school’s 25th anniversary.

With professionally oriented degree programs, recognition of life experiences, emphasis on applied liberal studies and commitment to community, SNL offers working adults a pathway to higher education in a way that meets their needs.

“SNL was built upon educational principles that value students’ prior learning from experience, their workplace-based knowledge and skills, and their perspectives as older students that traditional students wouldn’t learn about in textbooks. This is what makes adult learning such a fascinating and exciting project,” says Interim Dean Don Opitz. Don Opitz



Interim Dean Don Opitz shared remarks during the spring gala. (Diane M. Smutny/DMS Photography)

For Associate Professor Susan McGury, producer of the anniversary documentary, SNL is like no other place for adult learners. From its inception, SNL has placed students from the working world in command of their learning pathways.

“This method of education puts the student in the driver’s seat while surrounding them with lots of supports and resources. Add to this the lifelong-learning element, which is about building skills, and the result is the confidence to know that you can teach yourself anything,” she says.

Having graduated its 10,000th student this past summer, SNL continues its commitment to serving a unique learning population, even as it pivots to respond to changes in its market.

According to recent studies, SNL students are older, average age 36, work more hours than other DePaul students, 68 percent work 30 or more hours per week, and attend part time, 87 percent. They also express greater satisfaction with their advising and academic experiences. Also, the proportion of SNL’s African-American students is significantly higher than the same demographic for adult learners across DePaul.

SNL continues to reinforce its commitment to the larger community.

“Students who come to our programs are already very much engaged with their communities. This is something that DePaul values and SNL especially emphasizes,” Opitz says.

This summer, SNL will officially become the School of Continuing and Professional Studies.

Building upon its strengths in online and flexible degree program options, the school will become even more competitive in an already competitive marketplace by offering more specialized degrees. This includes new undergraduate degree programs in business administration, computing and health care administration in partnership with the College of Science and Health.

“These developments will enable us to reach a wider net of students and be more successful. I’m excited about us being more innovative as we explore new degree programs and engage in the business of certificates and stackable credentials,” Opitz says.

Looking ahead to a future under the SCPS banner means both change and consistency.

“One thing is sure: The school is proudly advancing its unique mission of engaging adults in learning that connects their academic studies with endeavors at work and in the community,” Opitz says.​

Source: DePaul Newsline, June 13, 2019

Saturday, May 11, 2019

Book Club Meeting, April 3

We had another lively discussion when we considered The Third Coast: When Chicago Built the American Dream by Thomas Dyja, in April. He deftly covered many aspects of the cultural, social, and political aspects of Chicago during the period after WWII through 1960, but the scope was so broad that many details were not fleshed out. The product of comprehensive and expansive research was combined with authorial conjectures about habits and personalities of prominent figures, which disrupted the flow of the narrative. We learned a lot about the immediate postwar time in Chicago, including details about politics, architecture, television, and popular culture. Once again, a rewarding and informative discussion.



Our next book will be Lillian Boxfish Takes a Walk by DePaul faculty, Kathleen Rooney. Check out this review from The New York Times
 We will meet Wednesday, June 5 in Room 115 of the Richardson Library.  We gather at 11, with discussion from 11:30 to 12:30, so please bring your brown bag lunch!  For further information contact Kathryn DeGraff oHelen Marlborough.



We will continue to review the titles on our list for consideration for upcoming discussions. Please let Kathryn, Helen, or anyone else in the group, know if you have a favorite book you would like to share with your DES colleagues. As you can tell from the posts, we are interested in a wide range of fiction and non fiction. We enjoy our sessions thoroughly and always have room for more people and more insights.

Thursday, May 2, 2019

DES Luncheon, May 1, 2019

More than 75 DES Members enjoyed camaraderie, ate a delicious lunch and heard from President Esteban regarding DePaul's strategic plans.

Additionally:
  • Fr. Edward Udovic, CM and Alice Farrell were thanked for their many years of DES support.
  • Don Casey, Marty Kalin and Nancy Rospenda were re-elected to the Steering Committee. Their terms end in 2022.
  • Sue Kosinski reported 5 scholarships were awarded this past year from the DES Scholarship fund.
  • Nancy Rospenda announced she was running for President. You had to be there!
  • Following the luncheon, Rich Goode provided an estate planning seminar for members

A good time was had by all.

Enjoy some photos from the day


Tuesday, March 12, 2019

In Memoriam - Drusilla Dillard

It is with sadness that we have learned of the death of Drusilla Dillard.  Drusilla served in the Law Library from 1993 until her retirement in 2015.  She passed away on February 28 at the age of 59.  A loving sister and doting aunt, Drusilla was kind and friendly, never failing to offer a smile and welcoming "hello" to everyone she met.

Services will be held this Friday, March 15 at AA Rayner & Sons Funeral Home, 218 E. 71st Street, Chicago 60619.  Visitation will begin at 11:00 a.m., followed by a memorial service at noon.
Our condolences go to the family, friends, and former colleagues who mourn the loss of Drusilla.  May she rest in peace.

Source: Mission and Ministry email, March 12, 2019

Thursday, March 7, 2019

Book Club Meeting, February 6

Our February book, The Things they Carried, generated a heated discussion on whether or not it was fiction or fact. Tim O'Brien's fictionalized story of his time in Vietman during the 1960's, caused some of us to discount it as just his fantasy of his experiences that didn't ring true. Others argued strongly that sometimes what is made up can provide more insight into the humanity of the men and their situation than any factual account of feelings and actions.  O'Brien referenced the idea of the difference between real stories and true stories throughout the book, which helped us all come to some understanding of his goal in writing this book. We were in complete agreement as to the power of his language and his ability to evoke emotion in his characters.  



Our next book will be The Third Coast: When Chicago Built the American Dream by Thomas Dyja.   Here is a link to a review from The New York Times.
  We will meet Wednesday, April 3 in Room 115 of the Richardson Library. Remember that we now start our group at 11 am.  We gather at 11, with discussion from 11:30 to 12:30, so please bring your brown bag lunch!  For further information contact Kathryn DeGraff or Helen Marlborough.



We will continue to review the titles on our list for consideration for upcoming discussions. Please let Kathryn, Helen, or anyone else in the group, know if you have a favorite book you would like to share with your DES colleagues. As you can tell from the posts, we are interested in a wide range of fiction and non fiction. We enjoy our sessions thoroughly and always have room for more people and more insights.