Byrne Hall

Byrne Hall
The Academy building was turned over to DePaul University, and renamed Byrne Hall. Bygone DePaul | Special Collections & Archives

Introduction

About the DePaul Emeritus Society

DePaul University values its ongoing connections with its faculty and staff retirees, as it values their past contributions to the university’s mission. The DePaul University Emeritus Society was founded in 2008 with the merger of the Staff Emeritus Society and the Emeritus Professors Association. The Society is sponsored by the University’s Office of Mission and Values.

The purpose of the DePaul Emeritus Society is to provide a means for ongoing connection, communication, and socialization between the university and its emeritus faculty and staff, and between individual retirees whose professional lives were for so many years dedicated to university service.

Photos, events, and information of interest to members of the DePaul Emeritus Society will be posted to this blog. Please take a look, add your comment, offer to be an "author" or just enjoy.

Sunday, October 20, 2019

Book Club October 2

The Art Forger by B. A. Shapiro led us to a wide reaching discussion about art, authenticity, and the creative process.  The novel told the story of a young painter creating a work in the manner of her colleague/lover, under his guidance. That led her to creating a forgery of a painting stolen from the Isabelle Gardener Museum in Boston. This fictional account of a real event brought up many interesting ideas about art. Among them: how do museums authenticate the works they display and what responsibility do they have when that authenticity is challenged; what about the relationships of collectors to pieces they sell, donate, or hide from public view; what are the techniques that forgers use to create their own works. We thought the characters were not as well defined as they could have been, but appreciated the clever resolutions to the many mysteries presented. We ended by considering that perhaps we all see and believe what we want to see. 


Our next book will be Educated by Tara Westover. You can read a review here.  We  meet Wednesday, December 4 in Richardson Library, Room 300.  Please note that we no longer meet in Room 115, but will schedule in other rooms from now on.  We gather at 11, with discussion from 11:30 to 12:30, so please bring your brown bag lunch!  For further information contact Kathryn DeGraff or Helen Marlborough.


We continue to review the titles on our list for consideration for upcoming discussions. Please let Kathryn, Helen, or anyone else in the group, know if you have a favorite book you would like to share with your DES colleagues. As you can tell from the posts, we are interested in a wide range of fiction and non fiction. We enjoy our sessions thoroughly and always have room for more people and more insights.

Tuesday, October 1, 2019

In Memoriam - Robert A. Griesbach

Dear Colleagues,

It is with sadness that we have learned of the death of Robert Griesbach. Bob taught at DePaul from 1955 until his retirement in 1989 from the Department of Biological Sciences and also served as its chair. Upon his retirement, he was awarded the Via Sapientiae Award by the university. Bob passed away on September 23 at the age of 95. He is survived by 5 children, 8 grandchildren, and 6 great-grandchildren.

Bob combined his work in cytology and genetics with botany research, resulting in major scientific advances that earned him recognition as a pioneer in plant physiology genetics and plant breeding.

Services will take place on Tuesday, October 15 at St. Mary Catholic Church, 528 Second Street, Menasha, WI 54952. Visitation at 9:30 a.m. for friends and family, followed by a funeral service at 11:30 a.m. Online condolences may be submitted at https://www.dignitymemorial.com/obituaries/cape-coral-fl/robert-griesbach-8866154

Our condolences go to the family, friends, colleagues, and former students who mourn the loss of Bob. May he rest in peace.

Thank you.

Source: Mission and Ministry email October 1, 2019


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Robert A. Griesbach

APRIL 11, 1924 – SEPTEMBER 23, 2019


Robert Anthony (Bob) Griesbach, age 95, passed away on September 23, 2019. Bob was born on April 11, 1924 in Menasha, WI, the son of William and Susan (Hauser) Griesbach. Bob graduated from St. Mary high school in 1942. Following graduation, Bob worked at the Institute of paper chemistry in Appleton WI for a year prior to being drafted into military service. Having played the clarinet from fourth grade on through high school, Bob was happy to be assigned to the 332nd transportation Corps Army band. Following service in the army during World War II, Bob moved to Chicago in 1947 where he began studies at DePaul University. Starting out in both biology and music he soon realized he had to chose between the two. Bob chose biology as his career option. After earning a bachelor of science degree in biology and a masters degree in botany, Bob went on to the University of Chicago to earn his PhD. After completing his graduate work in botany at Chicago, Bob returned to teach at DePaul in its biological-sciences department, eventually chairing the department. It was during his studies at the University of Chicago that Bob met Mary Lou Stoegbauer (also from WI) on a train ride into the city. They married in 1954. In 1958, Bob and Mary Lou moved to Park Ridge, IL. It was at their home in Park Ridge that Bob was able to blend his scientific work in cytology and genetics with his interest in breeding daylilies. This quickly became a lifetime interest. Eventually, Bob would go on to make contributions to the development of such plants as gladiolus, daylilies, and true lilies. Bob was one of the first botanists to develop a method for doubling the chromosomes in Daylilies; offering more color possibilities, increased vigor and substance, and larger flowers. Bob’s research resulted in major scientific advances and is recognized as a pioneer in plant physiology genetics and plant breeding.

In 1989, Bob retired from his work at DePaul. He was honored at the 1989 commencement as a recipient of the Via Sapientiae award, the highest award that the university can bestow upon a member of its community. Retirement allowed Bob to concentrate entirely on his work with daylilies. In 1991, he and Mary Lou made the decision to move to their home in Wisconsin. The relocation took two years because he had to transfer two crops of flowers-daylilies and lilies from his home in Park Ridge, Illinois to his daylily farm outside Delavan, Wisconsin. In 2007, Mary Lou passed away and Bob’s daughter Barbara, husband Frankie and daughter Gracie stepped in to care for Bob as he was legally blind from macular degeneration and unable to fully care for himself. In 2015, Bob developed heart and kidney disease and it was becoming increasingly more difficult for him to be out in his daylily fields without ending up in the hospital. In 2016, a job opportunity for Barbara gave the family an opportunity to relocate to Cape Coral FL. So, after 60 years, Bob hung up his hybridizing hat to be with his family in FL. It was now time for others to continue his work with the daylilies. In October of 2016, a group of trusted lily aficionados and friends gathered in what later was referred to as “The Big Dig” to salvage over 4,000 lily bulbs from Bob’s fields.

Bob is survived by 5 children: Robert (Pam) Griesbach Ellicott City, MD, James (Ann) Griesbach Orland Park, IL, Debra (Glenn) Andrews Georgetown, SC, Donald (Martin Morales) Los Angeles, CA and Barbara (Frankie) Kropacek Cape Coral, FL, eight grandchildren and 6 great-grandchildren. He is also survived by two sisters: Virginia Swichtenberg, Menasha; Donna Mahoney Menasha,WI.

Bob was preceded in death by his wife of 53 years Mary Lou, his four brothers: Norman (Katie) Griesbach; Marc (Mary) Griesbach; William (Joan) Griesbach and Donald (Sally) Griesbach and one sister: Sister Donna (Evangeline) SSND

It would be remiss of me if I did not share the vital role my mom played in my dad’s professional advancements as well as being the families matriarch. My mom was, as a dear friend described, a generous, delightful, and inimitable human being that took delight in making my dad and our family happy....even if it meant stepping aside and taking second fiddle. Our family will miss them both.

Funeral services will be at 11:30 a.m. on Tuesday, October 15, 2019, at St. Mary Catholic Church, 528 Second Street, Menasha. Friends and family may visit at the church on Tuesday from 9:30 a.m. until the time of service.

Source: Coral Ridge Funeral Home online: https://www.dignitymemorial.com/obituaries/cape-coral-fl/robert-griesbach-8866154

Wednesday, August 28, 2019

Book Club August 7

Born a Crime by Trevor Noah proved entertaining as well as informative.  His childhood and adolescent experiences growing up in South Africa under apartheid clearly depicted the brutal environment in a lively and often amusing manner. As a mixed race child, Trevor was not a part of any of the defined classes in South Africa, and had to make his way carefully through strictly defined social expectations and constraints. While some of us didn't like the casual style of his writing and wanted a bit more substance, we were unanimous in admiration for his mother.  Her struggles to guide Trevor into making the very most of his situation, often butted against his own uniquely stubborn and willful behavior. We shared some laughter over this one.



Our next book will be The Art Forger by B. A. Shapiro. You can read a review here .  W
e  meet Wednesday, October 2 in Room 115 of the Richardson Library.  We gather at 11, with discussion from 11:30 to 12:30, so please bring your brown bag lunch!  For further information contact Kathryn DeGraff or Helen Marlborough.




We will continue to review the titles on our list for consideration for upcoming discussions. Please let Kathryn, Helen, or anyone else in the group, know if you have a favorite book you would like to share with your DES colleagues. As you can tell from the posts, we are interested in a wide range of fiction and non fiction. We enjoy our sessions thoroughly and always have room for more people and more insights.

Sunday, June 30, 2019

Book Club, June 10

Lillian Boxfish Takes a Walk, by Kathleen Rooney was a great book for retirees to read. Set in New York in the 1980's, the 84 year old woman remembers her life as she walks one night through the city. As she walked,  passing places where she had lived, worked, and eaten, she recounted memories of her past. Through the places and those memories, Rooney wove a tale of reconciliation of a personal past and present, including regrets and revelations. In addition to evoking decades old Manhattan, the story of Lillian emphasized the role that civility plays in humanizing us, that casual interactions can have powerful impact on lives, and that memories can sustain us. We enjoyed the book and the conversation.


Our next book will be Born A Crime by Trevor Noah. You can read a review here here. We  meet Wednesday, June 5 in Room 115 of the Richardson Library.  We gather at 11, with discussion from 11:30 to 12:30, so please bring your brown bag lunch!  For further information contact Kathryn DeGraff or Helen Marlborough.


We will continue to review the titles on our list for consideration for upcoming discussions. Please let Kathryn, Helen, or anyone else in the group, know if you have a favorite book you would like to share with your DES colleagues. As you can tell from the posts, we are interested in a wide range of fiction and non fiction. We enjoy our sessions thoroughly and always have room for more people and more insights.

Thursday, June 20, 2019

Salma Ghanem appointed interim provost

Thursday, June 13, 2019


A LOOK BACK, A LOOK FORWARD: SNL TRANSITIONS TO SCHOOL OF CONTINUING AND PROFESSIONAL STUDIES


By Abigail Pickus / June 13, 2019 / Posted in: CAMPUS AND COMMUNITY Facebook

SNL celebration 2019


On May 31, DePaul hosted a gala celebrating the School for New Learning and its transition to the School of Continuing and Professional Studies.



 (Diane M. Smutny/DMS Photography)


The School for New Learning was founded nearly half a century ago. As the newly branded School of Continuing and Professional Studies, it continues to offer adult learners innovative programs that meet their needs.

When SNL opened its doors in 1972, the nation was in the midst of what came to be known as the nontraditional student movement.

“This meant the student came before the institution. That sounds basic now, but up to that time, the questions were always ‘what did the institution think’ not ‘what did the student think,’” recalls SNL founding Dean Howard Sulkin in a 1998 documentary DePaul produced in honor of the school’s 25th anniversary.

With professionally oriented degree programs, recognition of life experiences, emphasis on applied liberal studies and commitment to community, SNL offers working adults a pathway to higher education in a way that meets their needs.

“SNL was built upon educational principles that value students’ prior learning from experience, their workplace-based knowledge and skills, and their perspectives as older students that traditional students wouldn’t learn about in textbooks. This is what makes adult learning such a fascinating and exciting project,” says Interim Dean Don Opitz. Don Opitz



Interim Dean Don Opitz shared remarks during the spring gala. (Diane M. Smutny/DMS Photography)

For Associate Professor Susan McGury, producer of the anniversary documentary, SNL is like no other place for adult learners. From its inception, SNL has placed students from the working world in command of their learning pathways.

“This method of education puts the student in the driver’s seat while surrounding them with lots of supports and resources. Add to this the lifelong-learning element, which is about building skills, and the result is the confidence to know that you can teach yourself anything,” she says.

Having graduated its 10,000th student this past summer, SNL continues its commitment to serving a unique learning population, even as it pivots to respond to changes in its market.

According to recent studies, SNL students are older, average age 36, work more hours than other DePaul students, 68 percent work 30 or more hours per week, and attend part time, 87 percent. They also express greater satisfaction with their advising and academic experiences. Also, the proportion of SNL’s African-American students is significantly higher than the same demographic for adult learners across DePaul.

SNL continues to reinforce its commitment to the larger community.

“Students who come to our programs are already very much engaged with their communities. This is something that DePaul values and SNL especially emphasizes,” Opitz says.

This summer, SNL will officially become the School of Continuing and Professional Studies.

Building upon its strengths in online and flexible degree program options, the school will become even more competitive in an already competitive marketplace by offering more specialized degrees. This includes new undergraduate degree programs in business administration, computing and health care administration in partnership with the College of Science and Health.

“These developments will enable us to reach a wider net of students and be more successful. I’m excited about us being more innovative as we explore new degree programs and engage in the business of certificates and stackable credentials,” Opitz says.

Looking ahead to a future under the SCPS banner means both change and consistency.

“One thing is sure: The school is proudly advancing its unique mission of engaging adults in learning that connects their academic studies with endeavors at work and in the community,” Opitz says.​

Source: DePaul Newsline, June 13, 2019

Saturday, May 11, 2019

Book Club Meeting, April 3

We had another lively discussion when we considered The Third Coast: When Chicago Built the American Dream by Thomas Dyja, in April. He deftly covered many aspects of the cultural, social, and political aspects of Chicago during the period after WWII through 1960, but the scope was so broad that many details were not fleshed out. The product of comprehensive and expansive research was combined with authorial conjectures about habits and personalities of prominent figures, which disrupted the flow of the narrative. We learned a lot about the immediate postwar time in Chicago, including details about politics, architecture, television, and popular culture. Once again, a rewarding and informative discussion.



Our next book will be Lillian Boxfish Takes a Walk by DePaul faculty, Kathleen Rooney. Check out this review from The New York Times
 We will meet Wednesday, June 5 in Room 115 of the Richardson Library.  We gather at 11, with discussion from 11:30 to 12:30, so please bring your brown bag lunch!  For further information contact Kathryn DeGraff oHelen Marlborough.



We will continue to review the titles on our list for consideration for upcoming discussions. Please let Kathryn, Helen, or anyone else in the group, know if you have a favorite book you would like to share with your DES colleagues. As you can tell from the posts, we are interested in a wide range of fiction and non fiction. We enjoy our sessions thoroughly and always have room for more people and more insights.